Monday, May 25

harbour

The Wreck of the Adolphe
beaches, harbour, ships, storms, Uncategorized

The Wreck of the Adolphe

The French barque Adolphe is just one of many shipwrecks that litter the entrance to Newcastle Harbour, yet 110 years after the disaster, this vessel is still one of the most visible. Carol Duncan spoke with Deb Mastello of the Newcastle Maritime Centre. [ABC Radio 2014] A walk along the 2km stretch of Stockton Breakwall known as the Shipwreck Walk will allow you to see the remains of the Adolphe - yet the remains of The Sygna wrecked in 1974 are expected to be gone within the next decade. Having sailed from Antwerp, the Adolphe was ultimately heading for Sydney to load wheat, however in large seas the ship came to grief on Newcastle's notorious 'Oyster Bank' in 1904 after colliding with the wreck of another vessel, the Colonist, whilst being manoeuvred in to port by the tugs 'H...
Henry Martin – Victoria Lifeboat crew member
buildings, harbour, people, ships

Henry Martin – Victoria Lifeboat crew member

From Lost Newcastle member, Robyn Jeffries: Pleased to be able to share - my great great grandfather Henry Martin, far right, holding the boat. This is taken in the water around the Pilot Station where he worked as crew of the "Victoria" Lifeboat. (Olive Hoggan's (also her gr.g/father) photo.) Henry Martin d.1899, No 2, Pilots Row, Newcastle, now called the Boatmens Cottages on Nobbys Rd. opposite Fort Scratchley. The 1st rescue while working on the "Victoria", we have record of, is the "City of Newcastle". The little boy in the photo is Charles Henry Martin, son of Henry Martin, so dates the photo to approximately 1880.
Ralph Snowball Collection
beaches, buildings, coal, harbour, industry, people, ralph snowball, recreation, schools, ships, swimming pools

Ralph Snowball Collection

Anyone who is keen on Newcastle's history owes a great debt of gratitude to Ralph Snowball. Thousands of his glass negatives have been preserved and digitised by the University of Newcastle Archives and Cultural Collections and browsing through them on Flickr is bound to lead to hours disappearing down this fantastic historical rabbit-hole.
Zaara Street Powerstation
buildings, businesses, coal, harbour, industry, work

Zaara Street Powerstation

From Wikipedia: Zaara Street Power Station was situated on Zaara Street, in the city of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. It was built to supply power for the New South Wales Government Railways (NSWGR) in 1915, when the first turbo-alternator of 2.5 megawatts was commissioned. The installation of additional plant in 1920 led to a generating capacity of 28.5 megawatts (MW). Surplus capacity in the Railway Commissioner's power grid was sold to municipal councils and other bodies responsible for the supply of electricity to the general public. Zaara Street Power Station was connected to the grid of the Electricity Supply Department of the Newcastle Borough Council in 1917, and supplied much of Newcastle's electricity needs throughout the 1920s. Later known as the Newcastle Ele
The ‘Pasha’ Storm – June 2007
beaches, harbour, people, ships, storms, Uncategorized

The ‘Pasha’ Storm – June 2007

Most people in Newcastle and the Hunter were looking forward to a relaxing long weekend, planning a few days off. As we now know it was anything but a relaxing long weekend. The Newcastle and Hunter Region will never forget the weekend when storms and floods closed down the heart of Newcastle, the Pasha Bulker went aground on Nobbys Beach and the levee system around Maitland was pushed to its limit. On Thursday night, June 7, 2007, the Bureau of Meteorology warned of potential extreme weather conditions with a low pressure cell developing just north of Newcastle. Over the next 12 hours this low generated gale force south easterlies that buffeted the city until midday on Friday, June 8, redeveloping in the middle of the afternoon as a line of thunderstorms that ceaselessly ba...
harbour, people, ships, work

Governor Northcott 1947

From Lost Newcastle member, Chris Watsford: My grandfather Sgt Bill McKie performing escort duties (then Cst) for Governor Northcott (walking off gangplank) at Newcastle. This was taken on 12/9/1947 and the arrival of the Governor was to coincide with the landing of Lieutenant Shortland at the mouth of the Hunter River 150 years before.