Monday, May 25

Uncategorized

Star Hotel
buildings, hotels, Uncategorized

Star Hotel

Star Hotel 2013 - Photo: Carol Duncan Everyone in Newcastle reckons they know someone who was at the Star Hotel on the night of 19 September 1979 - so far that means some 200,000 people claim to have been there. Newcastle's Star Hotel is perhaps best known for the riot of 19 September 1979 and the song of the same name by Cold Chisel. The Star Hotel had never been pretty and by the late 1970s, the owners of the pub - Tooth & Co - had pretty much had enough of trying to improve the reputation of a pub which catered for the seafaring drinkers at the Hunter Street bar, the live music punters at the King Street bar, and Newcastle's LGBTQI community somewhere in the middle. Star Hotel Riot 19 September 1979. Photo - Ron Bell. In September, the hotel was given one week's no...
The Wreck of the Adolphe
beaches, harbour, ships, storms, Uncategorized

The Wreck of the Adolphe

The French barque Adolphe is just one of many shipwrecks that litter the entrance to Newcastle Harbour, yet 110 years after the disaster, this vessel is still one of the most visible. Carol Duncan spoke with Deb Mastello of the Newcastle Maritime Centre. [ABC Radio 2014] A walk along the 2km stretch of Stockton Breakwall known as the Shipwreck Walk will allow you to see the remains of the Adolphe - yet the remains of The Sygna wrecked in 1974 are expected to be gone within the next decade. Having sailed from Antwerp, the Adolphe was ultimately heading for Sydney to load wheat, however in large seas the ship came to grief on Newcastle's notorious 'Oyster Bank' in 1904 after colliding with the wreck of another vessel, the Colonist, whilst being manoeuvred in to port by the tugs 'H...
St John’s Anglican Church – Cooks Hill
buildings, churches, suburbs, Uncategorized

St John’s Anglican Church – Cooks Hill

Designed by Edmund Blacket and constructed between 1857 and 1860, St John's Anglican Church in Cooks Hill is Newcastle's oldest standing church with a busy and vibrant modern congregation. [Local Treasures ABC Radio 2013] Reverend Stewart Perry says even though it is the oldest standing church left in Newcastle, it's got a lot of history and is, "Above all, it's just a gorgeous building." Unusually, the timber ceiling of the church is painted pale blue and dotted with stars, Rev Perry says it's a feature of the work of the architect, Edmund Blacket, "People often wonder if the stars are something that was added later but it was one of the original features." "It was a trademark of the architect who designed the building. He painted the ceilings blue and had stars just ne...
Centenary Antique Centre
businesses, people, Uncategorized

Centenary Antique Centre

Centenary Antique Centre This was the Centenary Antique Centre, situated at 29 Centenary Road, Newcastle. Once a collection of 32 antique and bric a brac vendors, one part of it was set up as an original old store. After the closure of the Beaumont Street Antiques Centre in 1993 following the 1989 earthquake, Richard Owens AM offered the use of the Centenary Road building for the stallholders and included antiques from his own family's collection. Centenary Road Antiques closed in 2013 after the purchase of the building by Jerry Schwartz.
Joy Cummings – Australia’s first female Lord Mayor
people, Uncategorized, work

Joy Cummings – Australia’s first female Lord Mayor

From visitnewcastle.com.au:Joy Cummings was Australia’s first female Lord Mayor and the Lord Mayor of Newcastle from 1974-1984. She had many achievements during her time in office and left a tremendous legacy to the city after her death in 2003. Her interest in politics began in 1938 at age 15 when she joined the ALP. Whilst maintaining her involvement in ALP politics, Joy married Ray Cummings and raised four children. Her political life began in 1968 as the first woman to win a seat on Newcastle City Council, when she was appointed alderman of the city’s East Ward. Joy’s first political venture was campaigning to save Moreton Bay Fig trees in Islington. During her political career she was known for her many environmental achievements in Newcastle including the preservation of Blackbutt Re
Snow on Mt Sugarloaf – 18 July 1965
recreation, Uncategorized

Snow on Mt Sugarloaf – 18 July 1965

According to Wikiski it's snowed at least twice on Mt Sugarloaf! It snowed in 1965 and again in the early 1970's on Mt Sugarloaf which has an elevation of about 350m and is about 20km SW of Newcastle. According to a Newcastle Herald article at the time, snow settled in West Wallsend, which is barely 70m ABSL. Snow for the first time in history settled all around the low lying hills around Maitland, Cessnock and Singleton. Photo submitted by Lost Newcastle member Marc Walters The local Lions Club was so excited they installed a plaque!